Participants

Keynote Speakers:

  • Martha Rittenhouse Treichler studied with Josef Albers and Charles Olson at Black Mountain College in 1947-48, where she met her future husband Bill. Together they pioneered organic farming and homesteading in several parts of the US, and taught at experimental schools, until settling in Hammondsport, NY, where they founded The Crooked Lake Review. Her Black Mountain to Crooked Lake: Poems 1948-2010, with a Memoir of Black Mountain College , now available from FootHills Publishing (Kanona, NY).
  • Mary Emma Harris, independent scholar, noted historian, author of The Arts at Black Mountain College and Remembering Black Mountain College, and director of the Black Mountain College Project http://www.bmcproject.org
  • Ed Sanders is a distinguished American poet, musician, peace activist, investigative journalist, and editor of The Woodstock Journal. He was a close associate of Charles Olson, and friends with many of the Black Mountain poets. His numerous books of poetry include America: A History in Verse, Poems for New Orleans, Hymn to the Rebel Café, Crack of Grace, The Poetry & Life of Allen Ginsberg, Chekhov, Poem from Jail, 1968, and Peace Eye. His best-selling prose works include The Family and Tales of Beatnik Glory. Ed was the founder and leader of The Fugs, a legendary folk-rock poetry satire group that has issued many albums and CDs over the decades. The Fugs Final CD (Part 2) was released in 2010. In the public recitals of his poetry, Sanders brings a mix of chanted, spoken and sung works, sometimes utilizing musical instruments of his own invention, including the Talking Tie, the Pulse Lyre, the Light Lyre, the Microlyre, and the Mona Lisa Lyre.
  • Basil King is a painter/poet, born in England before World War II and living in Brooklyn since 1968.  He attended Black Mountain College as a teenager and completed an apprenticeship as an abstract expressionist painter in San Francisco and New York. Since 1958 in San Francisco he has been involved with poets, producing covers and art for poetry books, including LeRoi Jones’ groundbreaking magazine Yugen. He began to write himself in the 1980’s and now practices both arts daily. His books include mirage: a poem in 22 sections, Warp Spasm, Identity, and 77 Beasts/Basil King’s Beastiary.  Two recent chapbooks, In the Field Where Daffodils Grow (Libellum, 2009) and Wild Cards (Cy Gist, 2010) contain excerpts from his on-going work “Learning to Draw/A history.”  An exhibition of his paintings, “The Green Man,” was presented at Poets House in New York, March – June, 2010. Pennsound – Basil King page: http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/King-Basil.php
  • Martha King was born in Virginia in 1937. She attended Black Mountain College in the summer of 1955 and married Basil King in 1958. She began writing in the late 1960s, after the birth of their two daughters, Mallory and Hetty. Living in Brooklyn since 1968, King produced 31 issues of Giants Play Well in the Drizzle (sent free to interested readers), worked as an editor in mainstream book publishing, for Poets & Writers, and for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.  Her most recent book is North & South, a collection of short stories. Other stories have been anthologized in Fiction from the Rail and The Wreckage of Reason. Currently, King edits a prize-winning magazine for the National MS Society and is at work on a memoir, Outside Inside, chapters of which have appeared in Bombay Gin and New York Stories.

Performing Artists (In Order of Appearance)

  • The Handmade Orchestra (Steve Greene, Christina Schmidt, June White-Storti, Paul Christoff, Clare Mann, Kinloch Nelson, Carl Christensen, Jackson Frenzel, Bernie Lehmann, Cathy Chou, Ira Srole, Nancy Wilder, Tim Sullivan, Jed Metzger, Mandy Elliot, Kristen Shiner McQuire, Scott Oliver, Matt Curlee, David Frenzel, Dejan Pejovic):“Music you have never heard on instruments you have never seen” is the credo of The Handmade Orchestra. It is a group of musicians from professionals to beginners who have built instruments out of their imaginations. Everything from fishing poles to bicycles, driftwood to pcv piping has all been coaxed into sound making forms. The scores are non-traditional and  are conducted sometimes by using graphics or hand gestures at other times using word cues or even light projections. The music is surprising, humorous, curious and well “music you have never heard before”. The Handmade Orchestra performs concerts and educational workshops that promote creativity and sound making. Contact www.TheHandmadeOrchestra.com for more information!
  • Richard Haisma considers Charles Olson to be his on-going Artistic Advisor.   He is presently Artistic director of GEOMANTICS DANCE THEATER in Rochester, New York.  For more than 40 years he has been a dancer, teacher, choreographer, and since 1994 a Certified Movement Analyst (CMA) and since 2004 a Master of Fine Arts (MFA).  After touring Europe, South America and the Middle East with the Murray Louis Dance Company in the 1970s, and performing with Rudolf Nureyev in Louis’ choreography on Broadway, he toured his own solo, evening-long performances throughout Europe and the US in the 1980s and 90s. He has been Guest Artist with the Dublin Dance Theatre (Ireland), the Laban Centre (London), and many others. He has in recent years been on the dance faculties of the University of Rochester, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, the Laban-Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies, Wesleyan University (CT) and Denison University (OH). He frequently teaches contemporary dance in cities throughout Italy. In 2004 he was Guest Teacher in Residence at the Venice Biennale. GEOMANTICS DANCE THEATER most recently had a two-week season at GEVA Theatre in Rochester.
  • Gerald Schwartz, who has studied with Irish-American poet John Montague, and Joseph Brodsky, has worked in collaboration with the performance ensemble Solomons Ramada, Faking Trains, as well as with drummer/percussionist Mike Lopez and sound-designer/guitarist Damian Catera, Roy Campbell, Steve Swell, Sabir Mateen and others. Light As Silver Vessel was choreographed by the Bellingham Dance Company, Spring 2008. His uniVERSE: A Thought Symphony premiered in Venice, Italy in 2009. Only Others Are: Poems was released by LEGIBLE PRESS in 2003.
  • Cast of Apollonius of Tyana: Sarah Slifer is a dance artist and educator based in Gloucester, MA.   She has worked with choreographers Vincent Cacialano, Maida Withers, and Caitlin Corbett, and composers Marten de Wind and Andrea Fontemaggi. From 2005 to 2010 she directed the Gloucester New Arts Festival, an annual festival of contemporary installation performance and art.  She is a 2010 Massachusetts Cultural Council Choreography Fellow. Matthew Swift is a Samuel Beckett scholar, interdisciplinary Modernist, and birder with old roots and a new family in that special place, Gloucester. Mark Wagner lives on a micro farm in Dudley, Massachusetts. He teaches writing at nearby Nichols College and writes poetry and music. Organizer of the recent Charles Olson Centenary Conference in Worcester, Mass. Elote Villanueva:  born brooklyn, ny.. founder of  the dragonfly lounge, author of aprilshower, member of satellite rockers, name elote villanueva, representing wormtown. Adam Morrison Zelny (Atom Xelny) is a Worcester resident who has been recording/performing in the local music scene for the past decade. His practice and love for a diverse group of instruments and genres has birthed several projects independently and with other musicians. He is currently active with The Dragonfly Lounge: a monthly musical convergence of musicians that perform original music in the Worcester area, and Industrial Sonic Echo: a group of experimental musicians whose music thrives off performance art and instruments crafted from found materials. http://www.myspace.com/siddharthveda.

Panelists & Poets

Sam Abrams, Professor Emeritus of Language & Literature, RIT. Formerly a Fulbright Professor of American Literature at the University of Athens and a poetry teacher (along with Joel Oppenheimer) at the St. Mark’s Poetry Project. Author of The Neglected Whitman and The Old Pothead Poems.

  • Stephen Baraban–Grew up in Brooklyn and Long Island, came to SUNY/Buffalo in 1973 and was jolted and exalted by the vistas opened up by John Clarke and Robert Creeley. He turned back to the New York City area for decades of both drudgery and cultural bedazzlement, and has now returned to the Scene of Instruction, to try to go as deep and wide as wide as he can in following out the imperatives of lines like “they listened//to the sententious,/with ears of the coil of the sea” [Olson, The Maximus Poems, p. 384]. He’s had poems in journals including House Organ, intent, and BlazeVox Online Journal.
  • Larry Belle, Professor Emeritus of History, RIT. Dr. Belle received his Ph.D. in Renaissance and Medieval History from the University of Rochester and did the research for his dissertation as a Fulbright Fellow in Italy. He taught European history at Wayne State University and Alfred University before joining the Center for Higher Education at the University of Michigan where he co authored Instructional Techniques in Higher Education. He came to RIT in 1976 where he has served as Director of Instructional Development, Associate Vice President for Faculty and Program Development, Dean of the College of Continuing Education, Acting Director of the Center for Multidisciplinary Studies, and Director of the graduate program in Cross-Disciplinary Professional Studies. As Senior Assistant to the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs he was responsible for launching RlT’s new undergraduate honors program. His community activities included serving as chair of the Wesley Community, a long-term care facility, and a member of the Board of BOA Editions, a leading non-profit poetry press. He is currently on the board of the Greater Rochester Arts Council.
  • Jen Bervin’s work has been shown at The Walker Art Center and is in many special collections including The J. Paul Getty Museum. She has received fellowships in art and writing from The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, The New York Foundation for the Arts, Centrum, The MacDowell Colony, and The Camargo Foundation and is an editor-at-large for jubilat. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Her books include The Dickinson Composites. New York: Granary Books, forthcoming Fall 2010; The Silver Book. Brooklyn: Ugly Duckling Presse chapbook, forthcoming Fall 2010; The Desert. New York: Granary Books, 2008; Nets. Brooklyn:Ugly Duckling Presse, 2004. Fifth Printing, 2010; A Non- Breaking Space. Brooklyn: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2005; The Red Box. New York: Represented by Granary Books, 2004; Under What Is Not Under. Potes & Poets Press, 2000.
  • Michael Boughn: Born and raised in Riverside, California Michael Boughn moved to Canada in 1966 because of his opposition to the war against Viet Nam. In Vancouver he met and studied with Robin Blaser who introduced him to the work of William Blake, Charles Olson, H.D., Jack Spicer, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams and other crucial writers. He spent nearly 10 years working in the Teamsters before returning to school to study with Robert Creeley and Jack Clarke in Buffalo, N.Y. where he received his PhD in 1986. Since 1993 he has lived in Toronto. He is the author of Iterations of the ­­Diagonal, Dislocations in Crystal, Into the World of the Dead, One’s own Mind, and 22 Skidoo/SubTractions. With Victor Coleman, he edited Robert Duncan’s The H.D. Book which is forthcoming from University of California Press. Book Thug will publish Cosmographia—a post-Lucretian faux micro-epic in the fall of 2010.
  • Alan Casline, Editor, Rootdrinker Magazine, publisher of Benevolent Bird Press, and founder of the Rootdrinker Institute (devoted to local history. bioregional culture, and environmental concerns of the Albany/Upper Normanskill watershed)
  • Josephine Clare, poet: Born in Southern Germany the year the Nazis seized power. Fast forward: Academy of Music & Drama, Stuttgart, 1954-1956. Left for Vienna, continued education in drama & acting; member of Austrian Actors’ Guild 1958. Married, moved to London 1958. Three wonderful Children, all paid for by the National Health Service. Worked for the BBC, translating British poets into German. Performed BBC radio plays. 1969 move to Iowa City, Iowa, performing in Beckett & Brecht plays. 1973 joined faculty at Hobart & Wm. Smith Colleges, Geneva, N.Y. Later taught at Syracuse University, Goddard College, FLCC, Ontario County Jail. Books: DEUTSCHLAND  (Morgan Press); DEUTSCHLAND & OTHER PLACES intro. Fielding Dawson, Black Mountain writer & artist (North Atlantic Books); MAMMATOCUMULUS (Ocotillo Press); TWELVE (Potato Clock Signatures); TRAIL NEWS (editing, interview) Ludovico Sculpture Trail, Seneca Falls; INTERCHANGE; SCULPTURE FOR A CHANGING LANDSCAPE (essay) Stone Quarry Hill Art Park, Cazenovia N.Y.; TRANSLATIONS INTO GERMAN a. o. w/Anselm Hollo: PATERSON by W.C. Williams (Goverts, Stuttgart), GASOLINE, Gregory Corso (Limes, Wiesbaden), KADDISH, Allen Ginsberg (Limes, Wiesbaden)
  • Cass Clarke From 1973 until his death in 1992 Cass Clarke served as John Clarke’s typist, proofreader and text editor beginning with Jack’s From Feathers to Iron: A Concourse of World Poetics, Tombouctou/Convivio, 1987, and ending with the posthumous In The Analogy, shuffaloff books, 1997.  From 1997 to 2008 she served as Education Director for Just Buffalo Literary Center.  Currently, Cass is searching for a new project.
  • Jim Cohn is a poet, disabilities advocate, and creator of the Museum of American Poetics (www.poetspath.com). The author of Sign Mind: Studies in American Sign Language Poetics, he introduced Allen Ginsberg to Deaf poets at NTID in 1984 and in 1987, he coordinated the first National Deaf Poetry Conference, in Rochester, NY. The importance of his role in the history of American Sign Language (ASL) poetics was documented in a 2009 film by Miriam Nathan Lerner entitled The Heart of the Hydrogen Jukebox. Jim Cohn earned an M.S. Ed. in English and Deaf Education from the University of Rochester and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID).
  • Victor Coleman is the author of numerous books of poetry, starting with the 1964 publication of From Erik Satie’s Notes to the Music, through CORRECTIONS (1985), LAPSED WASP (1994), and ICON TACT (2006). BookThug will release his The Occasional Troubadour in October. He was a founding editor of both Coach House Press (in 1966) and Coach House Books (in 1997) and has laboured as a film programmer and creative writing instructor at Queens University, was Director of A Space, and co-director/programmer for The Music Gallery in Toronto. He was, between 2002 & 2006, the editorial director for the Centre for Contemporary Canadian Art (www.ccca.ca) and currently toils as a semi-retired free-lance editor. His latest non-BookThug publication, from Shuffaloff / Eternal Network is How to Become a Good Dancer. Early in 2011, The University of California Press will release his (and Michael Boughn’s) edit of Robert Duncan’s The H.D. Book.
  • James Cook’s work has appeared in The Cortland Review, Realpoetik, BlazeVOX and other journals. His first book Moments At Point Light is in manuscript. His current projects include “The Croatoan Songbook,” a long suite of serial poems intended as a vision of & prayer for America, as well as editing Le Mot Juste 2011, a Rochester poetry anthology. He lives in Rochester with fiance and fluffy cat.
  • Timothy Cook: year in seinäjoki, finland mid – 90s post high school. oneonta, ny upbringing before that business. st. lawrence university 97 – 01. a. g.: teacher. wien mixed in. after: otsego county’s daily star & black oak tavern. lived lower manhattan 03-05. asia (taipei, taiwan) for half year before n.y.s. return & 2,600 mile movement westward. missoula for grad school. olson. pound. clarke & glover. ç started mid 07 as tribute to olson’s vision of the little mag. read a curriculum of the soul july / august 07 in vis, croatia. currently serving as professional calendar shipper. hoping to have copies of ç iv printed for october’s black mountain north symposium.
  • Penelope Creeley lives in Providence, Rhode Island.
  • Andrew Davidhazy is a graduate of RIT and earned a BFA in Photographic Illustration and an MFA in Graphic Design. In 1966 he joined the Distillation Research Laboratory headed by Dr. Kenneth Hickman as a Research Photographer. Subsequently he was Director of the Division of Arts and Graphic Arts, CCE and now is a professor in  the School of Photographic Arts and Sciences. He was a Research Fellow at NASA Langley Research Center, VA. and the  inaugural Kodak Visiting Professor to Australia. He is the recipient  of the  Eisenhart Award for Outstanding Teaching and the Raymond  Bowman Award for teaching from the Society for Imaging Science and Technology. He is a Fellow of SPIE and IS&T. He collaborated with Drs. Leslie Stroebel and Ronald Francis on an investigation for the House Select Committee on the assassination of President Kennedy. He is a prolific author, speaker and exhibitor and has been a technical photography consultant for numerous industrial and governmental agencies.
  • Dale T. Davis founded the NYS Literary Center in 1979 where she continues to serve as Executive Director. She established The Sigma Foundation, a limited edition, private press with Dr. James Sibley Watson, Jr., avant garde filmmaker and publisher and editor of The Dial magazine. The Sigma Foundation published Mina Loy, Djuna Barnes, and Margaret Anderson. Davis’ writing has appeared in publications from The Iowa Review to Op-Ed page of The New York Times. Recent publications include chapters in Unseen Cinema and Classics In The Classroom. She has been a Board Member of The Jargon Society.  As a recognized expert on Youth Culture, she served as a consultant to The Children’s Dignity Project, ABC Network and was selected to participate in Harvard University’s Institute on The Arts and Civic Dialogue. Her work with young people was the subject of a Fox News Documentary. In 2009 she consulted with the College Board on its National Arts In Education Task Force.  As an advocate for Teaching Artists, Davis was one of the founders of the Association of Teaching Artists.
  • Richard Deming, Lecturer, Yale University, author of Listening on All Sides: Toward an Emersonian Ethics of Reading (Stanford University Press), and Let’s Not Call It Consequence (Shearsman), winner of the 2009 Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America. Also author of several published essays on the photography of Jonathan Williams.
  • Joe Flaherty is the Founder and Executive Director of Writers & Books, Rochester’s literary center for more than 30 years.
  • Albert Glover, Professor Emeritus, St. Lawrence University; editor of the Curriculum of the Soul series, fascicles featuring essays on poetics and mythology by some of the leading figures in the Black Mountain/Projectivist tradition (e.g., Robert Duncan, Ed Sanders, Alice Notley, Robin Blaser, Anselm Hollo, Duncan McNoughton, etc.).
  • Vincent F. A. Golphin: After more than 30 years as a writer, journalist and educator, Vincent F. A. Golphin is also now an assistant professor in the Department of English at Rochester Institute of Technology. Like A Dry Land: A Soul’s Journey through the Middle East is his most recent collection of poems. Others included the edited When Pluto Was A Planet: The Golphin Chronicles, a collection of short stories by RIT students, and Tales of a Summer, a brief volume of nonfiction by Rochester area high school students. His first book, Life and Other Things I Know: Poems, Essays and Short Stories, was published in 1999. Throughout the past eleven years the list includes: African American Children’s Stories: A Treasury of Tradition and Pride, Grandma Loves You: My First Treasury, African American Stories: My First Treasury, and contributions to Take Two, They’re Small, an anthology of poems, memoir, essay and fiction on food.
  • Patrick Graybill, noted poet and educator, joined the National Theatre of the Deaf in 1969, and his career as a performer, director, and teacher flourished. He has taught in NTID’s Performing Arts Department and Gallaudet University, and serves as Deacon of Rochester’s Emmanuel Church of the Deaf.
  • Kaplan Harris is Associate Professor & Director of the Graduate MA Program in English at St. Bonaventure University. His recent criticism appears in Wild Orchids, Paideuma, American Literature, Artvoice,  Contemporary Literature, & The Poetry Project Newsletter.  He is also editing, with Peter Baker & Rod Smith, The Selected Letters of Robert Creeley for the University of California Press. A short preview of letters can be read in Jacket <http://jacketmagazine.com/31/rc-rodsmith.html> 31 (2006).
  • Richard Hirsch is a graduate of RIT with an MFA in ceramics; he also holds a BS in art education from SUNY at New Paltz. He is professor of ceramics and ceramic sculpture at RIT’s School for American Crafts and was an associate professor of ceramics at Boston University, where he taught a program in artisanry. His work is in the permanent collections of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, the American Crafts Museum, the Ohi Museum in Japan, the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria in British Columbia, and others. His art has been featured in publications such as “The Craft and Art of Clay,” by Susan Peterson, and “Raku, A Practical Approach,” by Steven Branfman. He is the subject of The Uncommon Denominator: A Tribute to Richard Hirsch, by Richard Hirsch, E. Blaise DePaolo, Marvin Sweet (RIT Cary Graphics Press, 2004)
  • Steven Huff is a poet and fiction writer, and the Director of Adult Education and Programming at Writers & Books. He teaches creative writing at RIT and the Eastman School of Music, and was until recently the voice of “Fiction in Shorts” on WXXI-FM. Steve’s book of poems, More Daring Escapes, was published in 2008 by Red Hen Press, and a book of stories, A Pig in Paris appeared in 2009 from Lake Affect Publishers. His previous books include The Water We Came From, published in 2003 by FootHills Publishing, and Proof, which was named Editor’s Choice in the 2004 Two Rivers Review Chapbook Competition.
  • Kitty Jospe is known for her enthusiasm and creative energy in teaching, which feeds linguistic and musical color in her writing. MA, French Literature, NY University; MFA, Creative Writing, Poetry, Pacific University.  Her first book, Cadences, came out in March 2010, published by FootHills.
  • Michael Kelleher is the author of two collections of poems, Human Scale (2007) and To Be Sung (2005), both from Blazevox Books. With Ammiel Alcalay, he founded the OlsonNow project and blog in 2005. He lives in Buffalo, NY where he works as the Artistic Director of Just Buffalo Literary Center. His ongoing blog/memoir project, Aimless Reading, can be found at http://pearlblossomhighway.blogspot.com.
  • Margaret Konkol is a Ph.D. candidate in the Poetics Program at SUNY Buffalo. Her dissertation traces the parallel emergence of environmental thinking in popular and avant-garde discourse between the years 1921-1964. She received her MA from the University of Virginia and her BA from Reed College where she wrote her theses, respectively, on Louise Bennett and Gertrude Stein.  Her work appears or is forthcoming in Reconfigurations, Shampoo, Little Red Leaves and Damn The Caesars. Her article “Creeley in Age: Negative Poetics in Robert Creeley’s Late Work” appears in Jacket 31. She curates the Mildred Lockwood Lacey Small Press in the Archive Lecture Series.
  • David Landrey, Professor Emeritus, Buffalo State College; editor with Dennis Maloney, of Poetry: the Ecology of the Soul (Buffalo, NY, 1983 ), which includes several talks by Joel Oppenheimer and a selection of that Black Mountain alumnus’ poetry, as well as several volumes of his own poetry. He has recently had essays published on William Bronk (in a collection from Talisman House), and on Robert Creeley and Joel Oppenheimer (in The World in Time and Space: Towards a History of Innovative American Poetry in Our Time (Talisman House). He participated in the 2009 “Re-Viewing Black Mountain College” conference in Asheville, NC.
  • Miriam Lerner is a sign-language interpreter at RIT, and director of the first full-length documentary on ASL Poetry, The Heart of the Hydrogen Jukebox (2009).
  • Joel Lewis is the author of LEARNING FROM NEW JERSEY,VERTICAL’S CURRENCY & HOUSE RENT BOOGIE; the editor of the selected talks of Ted Berrigan, the selected poems of Walter Lowenfels & the editor of Bluestones & Salt Hay (Rutgers U. Press, 90), an anthology of contemporary New Jersey poets, which was praised by those who were in it & reviled by those who felt they were “excluded” from the tome. According to the Encylopedia of New York School Poets (Facts on File, 2009), he is the solitary member of the 4th Generation of NY School Poets. Brickbats and spam can be aimed at Hoboken, NJ, where he shares the air with Buddy, “The Cake Boss” of the Reality TV Universe.
  • Karla Linn Merrifield. A four-time Pushcart Prize nominee, one-time Best of the Net nominee, and 2009 Everglades National Park Artist-in-Residence, Karla Linn Merrifield has had poetry appear in dozens of publications as well as in many anthologies. She has five books to her credit, including Godwit: Poems of Canada, which received the 2009 Andrew Eiseman Writers Award for Poetry. Forthcoming from Finishing Line Press is her chapbook, The Urn, and from Salmon Press, her full-length collection Athabaskan Fractal and Other Poems of the Far North. She was founding poetry editor of Sea Stories (www.seastories.org), and is now book reviewer and assistant editor for The Centrifugal Eye (www.centrifugaleye.com) and moderator of the poetry blog, Smothered Air (http://smotheredair.yuku.com/).  She teaches at Writers & Books, Rochester, NY. You can read more about her and sample her poems and photographs at http://karlalinn.blogspot.com.
  • Linda Reinfeld, Lecturer in English, RIT, author of Language Poetry: Writing as Rescue (LSU Press, 1992), the seminal critical study of the Language Poetry Movement (part of the Horizons in Theory and American Culture series)
  • R. Roger Remington considers himself primarily a teacher who has critical interests in design studies (graphic design history, theory and methods), research, writing and graphic design practice.  His teaching quality was acknowledged with receipt of the Eisenhart Annual Award for Outstanding Teaching, RIT’s highest recognition of teaching excellence. In 2006 he was named the Massimo and Lella Vignelli Distinguished Professor of Design. Since 1982 he has been seriously engaged in the research, interpretation and preservation of the history of graphic design.  He has written four books: Nine Pioneers in American Graphic DesignLester Beall: Trailblazer of American Graphic, American Modernism- Graphic Design 1920-1960 and his new book Design and Science-The Life and Work of Will Burtin will be published in 2007. At RIT he has developed a unique scholarly resource, the Graphic Design Archive which involves preserving and interpreting the original source materials of 35 Modernist design pioneers. Most recently he has been instrumental in extending this archival development with the acquisition of the works of Massimo and Lella Vignelli. This extensive collection will be housed in a new facility, the Vignelli Center for Design Studies.
  • Mary Richert received a Master of Arts and Humanities degree from SUNY/ Buffalo where she studied with Robert Creeley and Joel Oppenheimer. She was awarded a New York State Foundation for the Arts Fellowship for her creative writing non-fiction, and then served on its panel of judges.  She taught poetry as an adjunct at Canisius College, and now after three decades of teaching English for the Williamsville Central Schools, she is a full time free-lance writer.  Her work has been published in The Denver Quarterly and in many small magazines.
  • John Roche, Associate Professor of English, RIT; studied with George Butterick and Charles Boer as an undergrad at the University of Connecticut, where he first became acquainted with Olson’s poetry; earned a PhD at SUNY/Buffalo, studying with Robert Creeley and Jack Clarke;  author of two books of poems, On Conesus (2005) and Topicalities (2008), through FootHills Publishing (Kanona, NY), edited a book of tributes to poet Sam Abrams (Spuyten Duyvil, 2008) and co-edited an Auburn Prison poets anthology (FootHills 2009); new poetry  book titled Road Ghosts due to appear in January through theenk Books (Palmyra, NY, and simultaneously through Big Bridge.org. Dr. Roche currently serves as Associate Chair of the English department at RIT, as well as a member of the Board of BOA Editions, Ltd.
  • Tate Shaw is Director of Visual Studies Workshop, a center for the media arts with an MFA Program in Visual Studies, and co-publisher of Preacher’s Biscuit Books, both in Rochester, NY. He is also an artist with work in most major collections for artists’ books and writes essays, reports, and reviews on artists’ books and photography for Afterimage, JAB, Contact Sheet, and The Blue Notebook, amongst other publications. Tate has an MFA from VSW and a BA from William Jewell College in Liberty, MO.
  • Keith Smith has made 275 books since 1967. Fifty–four of these have been self-published, including nine textbooks-on-books. Smith has received two Guggenheim Fellowships, a National Endowment for the Art (NEA), and other grants, including thePollock/Krasner Foundation, Pilot Fine Art Still Photography Grant in 2002. His work is in the collections of the Museums of Modern Art of New York and San Francisco. Other museums include the Library of Congress, The Rosenwall Collection; the Victoria and Albert, London; The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris; and the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography. His latest book, Jonathan in Rochester, chronicles Jonathan Williams’ visits to this city.
  • Eddie Swayze is a poet, performing artist, actor, visual artist, electronic music composer, and educator. He discovered ASL poetry during the 80′s, and now  presents his ASL poetry along his original composed electronic music and video. Mr. Swayze graduated with an MFA degree from Rochester Institute of Technology. He teaches American Sign Language at Rochester School for the Deaf and tutors English/Literature at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. His poems have been published by HandType Press,  Gallaudet University Press, Clevis Press, Tactile Mind Press, Dark Lady Press, Talon Magazine, and a few more. He won two awards in ImageArt poetry reading as part of the annual GLBT ImageOut Film Festival. His poetry performance is featured in a short clip in the documentary film The Heart of The Hydrogen Jukebox by Miriam Lerner. He received two New York State Council on the Arts grants and four Strategic Opportunity Stipends grants.
  • Steve Tills is the author of four books of poetry (Invisible Diction, Loose Gravel, 1996; The Helen Keller Series, Furniture Press, 2004; Behave, dPress, 2006; Rugh Stuff, theenk Books, 2009). He edits the literary journal Black Spring and publishes experimental poetry through his press, theenk Books. B.S. in Psychology, Jacksonville, 1979; M.A. in English, Sonoma State, 1988. He has worked as an English instructor, golf pro, and IT Tech. Married and lives in Palmyra, New York.
  • Kenneth Warren, retired director of the Lakewood, Ohio Public Library; editor of House Organ Magazine and editor of The Whole Song: Vincent Ferrini Selected Poems, from the University of Illinois’ American Poetry Recovery Series (2004), as well as numerous published essays on Charles Olson, Vincent Ferrini, and poetics.
  • Donald Wellman, Professor of Writing & Humanities, Daniel Webster College, for many years directed O.ARS, a literary and cultural organization focusing on experimental literature. A selected poems, spanning twenty years work, appeared in 1995 under the title, Fields. Prolog Pages was released by Ahadada in 2009 and Dos Madres will soon release his A North Atlantic Wall. Wellman has published criticism on key modernist figures such as Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, and Charles Olson, as well as contemporary world poetry. “In both my poetry and my prose, I engage a field poetics, using tropes like margin, frame or overlay to explore the ways in which cross-cultural contact or liminality produce meaning.” Wellman translated contemporary poetry from French, German and Spanish sources. Current translation projects include Jardín cerrado by Emilio Prados and three books by Antonio Gamoneda, 2006 winner of the Cervantes prize.